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Walking in Wise Counsel


By Benjamin H. Liles

          Blessed is the man who doesn’t walk in the counsel of the wicked, nor stand on the path of sinners, nor sit in the seat of scoffers; but his delight is in Yahweh’s law. On his law he meditates day and night. ~ Psalm 1:1-2, WEB


          Blessed [fortunate, prosperous, and favored by God] is the man who does not walk in the counsel of the wicked [following their advice and example], nor stand in the path of sinners, nor sit [down to rest] in the seat of scoffers (ridiculers). But his delight is in the law of the Lord, And on His law [His precepts and teachings] he [habitually] meditates day and night. ~ Psalm 1:1-2, AMP

          I would imagine that those of us who receive any amount of teaching or instruction that we don’t always like the methods with which we obtain them. In a typical classroom setting we receive instruction on those things we either find fascinating or wish to learn. I find a number of things in that same vein. For example, I love learning more about God, who I am with and in Him, how His Spirit works and the like. I also still love science, technology (to a certain degree), and a myriad of other subjects as well.

          Every subject needs to be treated with a certain level of care. The way we obtain valuable instruction, even in the extent of moving up in our jobs, enhances the knowledge we not only have but that we can impart to others. I would think that this is what David or one of the others who penned the Psalms was getting at. No one gets to a place of leadership without going through some form of “school of hard knocks.” God’s word, His law, shows us ways in which we can avoid more of the harder knocks that can sometimes knock us flat.

          What we’re being told is that when we don’t walk like those who ridicule, put down, or enslave others we’re all the more blessed. By thinking on what we’re taught by God we can model ourselves by what He’s done for us along the way. David understood this, and even though he fell on occasion he knew God still loved him enough to treat him justly and fairly.

          We know God’s law as it’s written on our hearts, showing us – when need be – either where we have fallen short, or keeping us blameless in His sight. More than anything the law shows us our need for a Savior: Someone who can sympathize, through the yoke of bondage off us, and lead us in His ways that bring and give us life. That is what Jesus did. If we allow that the Old Testament was temporary, and foreshadowing the person of Jesus Christ, then we can see exactly that it is by Jesus that we are “blessed” of God.

          Christ never walked in the footsteps of the so-called “religious right” of His day. He didn’t judge harshly those who desperately needed out from under the penalty of the law. Rather, he set those free who realized and saw their need for a Savior who said things like, “Blessed are the poor in the spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 5:3, Berean Study). James, a brother of Jesus, and writer of the book wrote, “Listen, my beloved brothers: Has not God chosen the poor of this world to be rich in faith and to inherit the kingdom He promised those who love Him?” (James 2:5, Berean Study).

          Likewise, when we learn something new it is to our betterment and to helping others along with where they are at.